Tag Archives: publish

Capturing Video to Tell Your Episcopal General Convention Story

Tips for Flips and Smartphones

by Susan Kleinwecher, Social Media Coordinator for the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth

Publishing video to explain and show your event is a great way to cKeep it steady! Pan slowly!onnect to your audience. Using your smartphone, tablet, or Flip video camera is an easy way to capture your video. Planning for success includes understanding the capabilities and limitations of these recording devices and how to overcome them.

Smartphones and Tablets: Most mobile device users take decent HD video. Most mobile devices capture poor sound, because the internal microphone is not powerful. Having said that, we always use what we have, because the worst camera ever is the one you don’t have with you. The major challenges while shooting are stability and lighting. This article offers easy-to-read, common-sense tips for lighting and stability, as well as overcoming the limitations of your camera’s sensors: Continue reading Capturing Video to Tell Your Episcopal General Convention Story

Who, me? You say I should “be social” at General Convention?

The Strategy of Using Social Media at the Episcopal General Convention

by Susan Kleinwecher, social media coordinator for the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth

The 77th General Convention of the Episcopal Church brings the opportunity for participants to share so much of their experiences in the governance of TEC and the shaping of the future of the church. And it is vital to do so, in ways perhaps unfamiliar to many. It’s insufficient in 2012 to simply go home and write a 2-page article and publish it along with the rest of your July news and email or snail-mail it to your normal recipients. Yes, by all means, do that, but do more, and do it during General Convention.

The “more” is important. It is vital to the life of our church in a time that we so clearly need to grow and reach further, especially to younger audiences, ones that will become the leadership of our church. It is vital to help “folks at home” understand the topics and discussions and decisions that shape our church.  It is important that we do this in a social context, because that’s where our reach is both strategic and effective.

It is heartening that so many dioceses have launched their convention publishing initiatives and sites, realizing why social media coverage is so important now:

  • Social networking has twice the click-throughs as email, reaching more of your audience.
  • Conversation about a subject engages more people than reporting about a subject.
  • Pictures and videos elicit more engagement than other forms of digital publication.
  • Social networking is a powerhouse for encouraging online engagement, improving and driving how people connect to your information.
  • When people feel more connected, they participate more and give more.

When we embrace and follow a new model of engagement and conversation, while not abandoning less timely, traditionally authoritative ones, we won’t leave any listeners behind, and we’ll grow new ones. It’s win-win.

Serious nonprofits use the social web in intentional ways, not as a gimicky playground, but as part of a larger communications strategy, driven by solid content.  Add to the content.  Be social at General Convention, on social media, perhaps in ways that are new to you.  Check in using Facebook or Foursquare so your peeps know you made it. Blog; perhaps enjoy the brevity of Tumblr. Post to Facebook, and Tweet about it all with hashtag #gc77. By all means, point us to your blogging on Twitter using #gc77 and a link shortened with bitly.com or goo.gl. Pin your good visual stuff, and tag it so we can find it. Add your ideas to the commentary every way you can.

The Church will be richer for the experiences and information you share in a timely manner and in newer ways.

 

Using Facebook for Episcopal General Convention

Admittedly, this is a timid approach to using Facebook

by Susan Kleinwecher, social media coordinator for the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth

What Facebook is:

Facebook it’s the largest social  network in existence, used more than any other on the planet.

Getting Started: Go to facebook.com and create an account. Set up an account, upload your image/avatar.   Find some friends! You’ll find people you know on Facebook, along with organizations you care about.

Tutorials: https://www.facebook.com/help/?page=260315770650470&ref=hcnav http://www.gcflearnfree.org/socialmedia   http://www.gcflearnfree.org/facebook101

Connect with the Diocese:  Go to facebook.com/DioFW and “Like” the diocese page. This will allow you to receive updates to the page and post to the page.

Post to our Diocesan Facebook Page: Our page allows posts by fans. Go for it! Post your resources, information, and links to blogs on our page; post to your personal profile as well.  Page admins may re-post your information to extend its reach.

Where are the tags? Facebook does not tag content. It’s quite different from WordPress, Blogger, Tumblr, Twitter, and Pinterest. It focuses on people connections, not content connections. Tag your content everywhere else, but not facebook.

Go Mobile: When you’re comfortable with using Facebook in your computer browser, know that every major mobile platform has a good, free Facebook app.

Why this is timid: I could make all our deputation a level of admin that facebook calls “content creator”  (see Facebook’s admin roles). I’m leery of that.  Somehow it changes the voice of the page from an official one to a more chatty, less-predictable one.

What comments do you have on my fearful approach- of NOT opening up Facebook and allowing our deputies to have admin roles, yet having the existing page managers and content creators re-post what our deputies share on the page?  What are other dioceses and organizations doing on Facebook, considering a flood of content from new sources? What approach do you recommend?

 

Using Pinterest for Episcopal General Convention

You mean I can Pin about GC77? Sweet!

by Susan Kleinwecher, social media coordinator for the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth

What Pinterest is: CNET says, “If Tumblr and StumbleUpon had a baby, they would likely give birth to Pinterest. Pinterest is a virtual bulletin board with pins; users grab things from around the internet and pin them to boards. Boards, owned by a user, possibly with other contributors,  are the organization tool, organized loosely around a topic or inte
rest.  The shareable content is called a pin; it is usually an image of some kind, with a description, links, and descriptive tags. In Pinterest the focus is on on quality images. It’s about (1)content (2)sharing and (3)sharing & commenting.  Got that? Sharing is real big on pinterest.

Getting Started: Go to Pinterest.com and request an invite; Pinterest is invitation-only now, but don’t let that be intimidating; it helps them manage their exponential growth without overloading their infrastructure and disrupting your access.  The email address you use is the one Pinterest will issue an invitation to.  Activate the invitation following the instructions in the email you will receive. Set up an account, upload your image/avatar.

Tutorial: http://pinterest.com/about/help/   http://www.gcflearnfree.org/socialmedia

At the start: After you create an account, create at least one board. Search for “Episcopal Diocese Fort Worth” and find the General Convention board. Follow it. By following it, the owner can allow you to contribute to it by authorising you and sending you an email. Follow any other boards you see that you like.

Get ready to Pin: Install the pinterest pin button (bookmarklet) in your browser (chrome, firefox, safari, IE)  http://pinterest.com/about/goodies/

Connect with the diocese:  search for “people” named “diofw” and follow the diocese at http://pinterest.com/diofw/. Follow the diocesan general convention board: http://pinterest.com/diofw/episcopal-general-convention-2012/.  Once you follow the boards, an admin may invite you to become a contributor.

Become a contributor to our convention board: Our convention board is set to “Me + contributors.”  Our convention pinners need to follow the diocesan GC pinboard http://pinterest.com/diofw/episcopal-general-convention-2012/, and be allowed as contributors, to contribute to it. Users added as contributors will receive an email notification. They can choose to remove themselves at any time.

Go Pin: You can find things to pin on most websites, or on Pinterest. In Pinterest, it’s easy – you search, and you RePin, or you comment.  You may find great resources on other sites; for example, the Episcopal Diocese of Maine will have a daily video blog on their convention site http://indy300.net/.

Good descriptions are essential content: Regarding pin descriptions, what you should ask yourself each time you write the description for a new pin is, “what would I search for if I was looking for this pin?” and “what do I say about this pin to convey the story I want to tell?” The more descriptive your pin is, the easier it will be for users to find, and for search engines to find, and the more valuable your pin is.  Add URLs whereever you can.  Also, it is very impotant to ADD TAGS (hashtags, keywords beginning with #)!  You can add multiple hashtags at the end of your description. For example, you might use any or all of these tags for a pin about convention: #gc77 #episcopal #church #worship #event #deputy #deputies #bishop. Add as many as you want, but keep them relevant to the image.

Best practices: Pin from the original source, pin from permalinks, give credit and include a thoughtful pin description, using URLs where you can.  If you pin from OUR blog or website, please remember to attach the URL to the pin and link the pin to relevant pages of our website.

@Mention: To mention another user in a pin description, use the form @username.

Go Mobile: When you’re comfortable with using Pinterest in your computer browser, if you are an iPhone user, you can download the Pinterest iPhone app.  There’s no official app for other mobile devices. Instead Pinterest implemented a HTML5 experience  inside of your mobile browser. Pinterest seems happy with that interaction; others find it clumsy and unsatisfying and wanting an app.

What tags do you recommend for GC77? How will you use Pinterest at  Convention.

Using Tumblr for Episcopal General Convention

Tumblr – Multi-media blogging with little moderation responsibility!

by Susan Kleinwecher, social media coordinator for the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth

TumblrWhat Tumblr Is: Tumblr is a microblogging service providing a short-form blog, or tumblelog, with an array of features allowing easy posts of text, quotes, photos, links, audio, and video posts. The multimedia platform is adaptable and easy to use. According to DigitalSherpa, “You can set up a Tumblr blog and be posting in the time it takes you to brew your morning coffee.” UnlikeTwitter, on Tumblr you don’t have to battle an uncomfortable 140-word character limit and you may freely post graphics with your posts. Tumblr combines all  the traditional elements of a blogging platform with the social and sharing features of popular social media networks, in a simple and concise platform.

Ahah! Tumblr does not have a comment feature. Wow, that simpifies moderation responsibilities!

Getting Started: At Tumblr.com, sign up for an account. Get familiar with your dashboard, which is where new posts of blogs you follow will be. Upload a portrait photo that looks like you for your primary blog, and a relevant image to represent any secondary blog like one you might have for the Episcopal General Convention.

Post text, photos, quotes, links, audio, video. Re-blog. Chat with others on Tumblr. Give it a try!

Tutorials:
http://www.pcworld.com/article/253487/how_to_get_started_with_tumblr.html
http://www.tumblr.com/tips

Connect with the Diocese: Go to  diofw.tumblr.com and follow the blog on Tumblr. Go to http://diofw-gc2012.tumblr.com/  and follow the blog on Tumblr. If you are in our deputaton, the blog admin(s) will manually invite you to contribute to the diofw-gc2012 blog. After you’ve been invited to contribute, write a test post in any format – text, photo, quote, link, audio, video.   When that works, you’re off and running!

Blog admins, you may invite others to contribute to your blog, from the blog dashboard under Members. Submit email addresses, and invitees will receive an email with instructions to join the blog and register if they are not a Tumblr user yet.  New members can post, but not change blog settings unlesss you promote them to an admin.

Best Practices (soooo good that we’d really like to mandate them): For each post : tag, tag tag – You don’t need to put a tag in quotes or start with a hashtag. Hit return on your keyboard to enter a tag. Then add another one! These keywords make your blog search-friendly, your content findable,  and they will promote SEO.  They are essential.

You’ll want to fill your content with links, not just to your website and other social sites, but to other blogs or people in your network. Each time your post is ‘reblogged’ it will carry these links with them. That’s good for SEO.

Engage with Others: Your way of engaging on Tumblr is to:

  • ‘Follow’ – Click in a particular Tumblr blog where it says ‘Follow’
  • ‘Reblog’ – Find a blog you enjoy that you would want shared and share it on your own Tumblr blog by cliking ‘Reblog’ at the top of that post.
  • ‘Like’ – Click on the heart on a post to ‘like’ the post.

Each Tumblr blog has its own URL, so audiences don’t need to be a member of the Tumblr community to view your posts. The URL makes your Tumblr page available to everyone. Tweet your Tumblr posts by URL.

Use a Tumblr bookmarklet (button on your bookmarks bar) to quickly share things you find on the web.

Go Mobile: When you’re comfortable with using Tumblr in your browser, get it on your smartphone by downloading the official Tumblr app for Android, iPhone, or Blackberry.

Add your ideas and comments on Tumblr!